Search

ANDRÉ CRAMER

… my view of where technology innovation will lead us

Tag

innovation

Watch out for these People and their Ideas: NEXT LIST 2017 – 20 Tech Visionaries who are creating the Future (various WIRED Staff)

Microsoft will build computers even more sleek and beautiful than Apple’s. Robots will 3-D-print cool shoes that are personalized just for you. (And you’ll get them in just a few short days.) Neural networks will take over medical diagnostics, and Snapchat will try to take over the entire world. The women and men in these pages are the technical, creative, idealistic visionaries who are bringing the future to your doorstep. You might not recognize their names—they’re too busy working to court the spotlight—but you’ll soon hear about them a lot. They represent the best of what’s next…

via WIRED Next List 2017: 20 Tech Visionaries Who Are Creating the Future of Business | WIRED

Good collection of Foresight Fails: The absolute worst Technology Predictions of the past 150 years (lya Pestov)

There’s a long-standing tradition among scientists, engineers, and industrialists. Every new year, they make predictions about a future.

Is blockchain a major technology, or it’s just a buzzword? Bots vs Apps: who will win in 2017? Will this finally be the year that virtual reality stops giving people motion sickness?

Well, technology has proven to be extraordinarily slippery over the past century. Despite the vast information that industry insiders have had at they’re fingertips, they’ve made some pretty terrible forecasts over the years…

Source: The absolute worst technology predictions of the past 150 years

Seven principles to ignite a culture of innovators (Alex Goryachev)

Every big company was a lean and mean startup at one time. Now, confronted with digital disruption all around us, we’re all rushing to rekindle the entrepreneurial flame that first put our businesses on the map.

Every company wants to be “innovative,” but “innovation” has become an overused buzzword that has lost its meaning. Executives at companies of all sizes toss the word around as if they’re doing it. They point to experiments that range from departmental contests and monetary awards to innovation fairs, idea boxes and time to dream big. Executives at one company even dressed up as innovation superheroes in an “intervention” to rally employees around innovation…

Source: Seven principles to ignite a culture of innovators | TechCrunch

Eleven Reasons To Be Excited About The Future of Technology (Chris Dixon)

In the year 1820, a person could expect to live less than 35 years, 94% of the global population lived in extreme poverty, and less that 20% of the population was literate. Today, human life expectancy is over 70 years, less that 10% of the global population lives in extreme poverty, and over 80% of people are literate. These improvements are due mainly to advances in technology, beginning in the industrial age and continuing today in the information age…

Source: Eleven Reasons To Be Excited About The Future of Technology — Medium

Totally amazed by the possibilities of Google’s Project Soli: touches interactions for next gen human-computer interfaces

Project Soli is developing a new interaction sensor using radar technology. The sensor can track sub-millimeter motions at high speed and accuracy. It fits onto a chip, can be produced at scale and built into small devices and everyday objects…

Source: Project Soli

Great Piece on how and why Google gets Corporate Innovation Right: Go Inside Google Brain (Greg Satell)

Apple fuses technology with design. IBM invests in research that is often a decade ahead of its time. Facebook “moves fast and maintains a stable infrastructure” (but apparently doesn’t break things anymore).

Each of these companies, in its own way, is a superior innovator. But what makes Google (now officially known as Alphabet) different is that it doesn’t rely on any one innovation strategy, but deploys a number of them to create an intricate — but powerful — innovation ecosystem that seems to roll out innovations by the dozens…

Source: Want to Do Corporate Innovation Right? Go Inside Google Brain

Solar Power Is Ready to Dominate Energy Thanks to New Tech (Singularity Hub)

In the next 20 years, between 50 percent to 100 percent of the world’s energy production could come from solar.

Today, the global oil and natural gas industry is about a $4 trillion business. It’s big money, and in the US, 67 percent of the electricity generated in 2015 was from fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, and petroleum)…

 

Source: Solar Power Is Ready to Dominate Energy Thanks to New Tech

Must-Read to understand where Facebook is heading: Facebook May Have Peaked as a Social Network. But It’s Reinventing Itself as Something Bigger (Will Oremus)

Even before it was the title of a movie, the phrase “the social network” was synonymous with Facebook. Mark Zuckerberg’s startup snatched the title from MySpace in 2008, and its pre-eminence among social networks has gone unquestioned ever since.

Now there are signs that it may have peaked. Not as a media platform, or as a place where people simply spend time on the web, and certainly not as a business. But as a social network per se—a place where people go to connect with friends and acquaintances—Facebook may be just beginning to wane…

Source: Facebook May Have Peaked as a Social Network. But It’s Reinventing Itself as Something Bigger.

Great Article on purpose-driven Entrepreneurship: Does Your Company Know Why It Exists? (John Battelle)

Many of the World’s Top Companies Can’t Explain Their Purpose. Why Knowing Yours Will Be a Competitive Advantage.

It’s remarkable to think that in an age defined by purpose, most large companies have no idea what their reason for existing actually is. The next 10-to-20 years will bring extraordinary challenges for big companies — nearly all of the Fortune 500 is threatened by massive secular change. If ever there was a time to identify your business’s core purpose, it’s now…

Source: Does Your Company Know Why It Exists? — NewCo Shift — Medium

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑